A Taiwanese American, Ie-Ming Shih has had an enduring interest in black-and-white street and urban photography since his college years. His photographs capture a glimpse of his own reality- abstract, enigmatic and at times surreal.  Finding an interesting object, person or dynamic between the two always excites him as a photographer.  Shih found this medium alluring because the camera inherently transcribes an objective view of reality, unlike other forms of art. Similar to painting, sculpting and music, the photographer must master the instrument in order to freely express. Each shot is dictated by the artist’s decision. The subject of prominence is personal because it is chosen by the photographer. As days and nights whiz by, we become increasingly consumed by this endless routine of living. We often overlook the magnificent simplicity of our world. Shih’s mission is to capture a slice of life that lingers, offering an open interpretation for each individual. He has moved to the United States since 1989 and currently is the Richard W. TeLinde Distinguished Professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, USA (www.gynecologycancer.org).  As a physician (pathologist) and a scientist, he leads his research team in gynecologic cancer research. He hopes to donate the profit from selling his art to support ovarian cancer research. These photos have been through a Light Room process for technical purposes such as cropping, converting color images to black-and-white (in "Reflection and Reality" and "Before I die..."), adjusting tonal quality and contrast/brightness. The intention of digital modification is not to construct a new perception but to enhance the original image.

 

shihie@yahoo.com    Baltimore, Maryland, United States

 

Photography brings one to a place and time that had never been imagined or experienced... yet it truly happened somewhere and sometime in the world.
— Ie-Ming Shih

 

 

Self portrait

Self portrait

For me the camera is a sketch book, an instrument of intuition and spontaneity, the master of the instant which, in visual terms, questions and decides simultaneously. In order to “give a meaning” to the world, one has to feel oneself involved in what one frames through the viewfinder. The attitude requires concentration, a discipline of mind, sensitivity, and a sense of geometry.
— Henri Cartier-Bresson